Register for an account

X

Enter your name and email address below.

Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Read our privacy policy.

X

Website access code

Enter your access code into the form field below.

If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Your website access code is located in the upper right corner of the Table of Contents page of your digital edition.

The Sciences

Pew! Pew! Take *that*, Mars!

Bad AstronomyBy Phil PlaitOctober 24, 2012 4:00 PM

Newsletter

Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

Hey, remember that one ton nuclear rover we sent to Mars? Yeah, that. On October 20, it aimed its megaWatt laser at the sand on Mars and blasted it 30 times in rapid succession, carving out a hole about 3 mm across. NASA kindly has provided a before-and-after animation of the damage inflicted on the Red Planet:

wxhUv.gif

Cool, eh? [Click to coherentlightenate.] Curiosity's laser is designed not as a weapon against a hapless Marvin, but instead to do actual science. It very rapidly heats the rock (or sand or whatever) to the point where it vaporizes. Material heated like that glows, and in fact glows at very specific colors. By identifying those colors, scientists can determine precisely what the material is composed of. I gave the details in an earlier post when Curiosity zapped its first rock. You should read it, because spectroscopy is cool, and I spent many years doing it. This sand was chosen to get lasered because it's made of fine grains that are blown by the wind. Some Martian sand is bigger, some smaller, but it's all pretty much formed from eroded rocks. But different grains may have different compositions, and be blown around differently. The only way to know is to find out. So Curiosity will be blasting various things as it roves around Gale crater, its home for the next two years. Curiosity's real name is Mars Science Laboratory, and it's useful to keep that in mind. It's not just some golf cart tooling around the planet; it's a fully functional science lab, with cameras, spectroscopes, sampling devices, and more. Everything it does is so we can learn more about Mars. What's the the history of the planet? Why is its geology the way it is? What's the deal with it used to having water? Where'd it all go? I think these are questions worth exploring, even if it means blasting tiny holes in the planet to find out.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP/LPGN/CNRS. Tip o' the Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator to Keri Bean, including the idea for the title.


Related Posts: - Now you will feel the firepower of a fully armed and operational Mars rover - Wheels on Mars - One small tread for Curiosity, one giant leap for roverkind - Curiosity looks Sharp - Gallery – Curiosity’s triumphant first week on Mars

2 Free Articles Left

Want it all? Get unlimited access when you subscribe.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Register or Log In

Want unlimited access?

Subscribe today and save 70%

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Register or Log In