Register for an account

X

Enter your name and email address below.

Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Read our privacy policy.

X

Website access code

Enter your access code into the form field below.

If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Your website access code is located in the upper right corner of the Table of Contents page of your digital edition.

The Sciences

This product contains vacuum

Newsletter

Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

I don't know if some advertisers are stupid, or if they assume we're stupid. Case in point: I hear commercials where they say things like they're product is "all natural". I like to point out that arsenic is an element. You can't get much more natural than that, but I don't want it in my lemonade. So what do you do when a product is advertised as having no chemicals in it? Especially when it's Miracle Gro, a product I'm pretty sure has at least some chemicals in it. Well, if you're like me, you blog about it. If you are the UK government's body in charge of advertising, you say it's OK for companies to lie about their products on the air. Happily, Frank Swain went the blogging route, writing about this on the Guardian's website. Read it an shake your head in wonder. Happily, nothing like that could ever be misleadingly advertised here in the UnitedStates.

Tip o' the protective hood to Science Punk.

    2 Free Articles Left

    Want it all? Get unlimited access when you subscribe.

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In

    Want unlimited access?

    Subscribe today and save 70%

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In