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The Sciences

Scalzi scalds and scolds Clinton

Bad AstronomyBy Phil PlaitMay 7, 2008 11:00 PM

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I wrote about Senator Clinton's campaign the other day, showing how I think she's jumped the shark. Well, author and blogger (and cool guy) John Scalzi hits the nail in the head, and that nail should be the last one in the coffin of Clinton's campaign. I fear it won't be, though; as I said she is running on nothing else but ego now, and I'm worried that even if the DNC tries to move her, she still won't budge. After all, she's still claiming she has momentum or come-up-from-behindedness or some other manufactured spin. Sigh. What happened to the strong candidate who had such great things to say about science? Let's hope that Obama picks up that mantle, if need be. P.S. After writing this, I found out that Lawrence O'Donnell at HuffPo talked to a senior Clinton campaign official who hinted she'll drop out in a month or so. Interesting. Money quote: "Nothing [the official] said indicated that he actually expected the superdelegates to move to Hillary in the week after the final election. The Clinton campaign has not lost its grip on reality. Yes, Clinton spokespersons publicly seem to be lost on gravity-free planet Clinton, but privately they know the end is near."

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