The Sciences

Books Made From Electrons!

Cosmic VarianceBy Sean CarrollFeb 21, 2012 1:47 PM

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[Updated to provide a better link for DtU overlord Carl Zimmer.] The conventional presentation of a book -- words and images printed on sheets, bound together in a folio -- is a perfected technology. It hasn't changed much in centuries, and likely will be with us for centuries to come. But that doesn't mean that other technologies won't be nudging their way into the same conceptual space. Everyone knows that the practice of publishing is being dramatically altered by the appearance of ebooks -- a very broad designation for book-length content that is meant to be read on an electronic device. At the simplest level, an ebook can simply be a text file displayed by a reading program. But the possibilities are much more flexible, allowing for different kinds of images, video, interactivity with the user, and two-way connections with the outside world. The production and distribution process is also much easier, which opens the door to books that are faster, shorter, longer, and quirkier than the usual set of hardbacks and paperbacks. If I put my mind to it, I could meander through this blog's archives, pick out a few posts, and have an ebook published by this evening. It would suck -- editing and presenting a good collection requires effort -- but it would be published. In the current state of the market, one question is: how do you find good ebooks to read, ones that don't suck? Into this breach leaps Download The Universe, a new website devoted to reviewing ebooks about science. Not just "science books with electronic editions," but books that only exist in the e- format. (Apparently we have already passed through the awkward hypenation phase, and gone from "e-book" right to "ebook.") Because it would be embarrassing not to, we also have a Twitter account at @downloadtheuni.

This brand-new project has been led by our inestimable blog neighbor Carl Zimmer, who has assembled a crack editorial team consisting of some of the world's leading new-media science journalists and also me. We'll be contributing regular (one hopes) reviews of ebooks old and new, all with a science focus. Suggestions welcome, of course. The world is going to change, whether we like it or not. It always feels good to help channel that change in constructive ways.

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