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Health

American medicine & American red-tape

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I just attended a presentation where a researcher outlined how epigenomics could help patients with various grave illnesses. Normally I don't focus on human medical genetics too much because it always depresses me. I don't understand how medical geneticists don't start wondering what hidden disease everyone around them has. In any case the researcher outlined how epigenomic information allowed for better treatment, so as to extend the lives of patients. All well and good. But then one individual in the audience began asking pointed questions as to the medical ethics of the enterprise, and whether the researcher had cleared some legally sanctioned hurdles. More specifically, there was a question whether exploring someone's epigenomic profile might expose private information of their relatives! (because relatives share epigenomic and genomic profiles to some extent) Frankly I began to get enraged at this point. People are suffering from terminal illnesses, and considerations of the genetic privacy of their near relatives are looming large? Seriously? The reality is that manifestation of a disease itself gives one information about the risks of their relatives. In any case, the researcher admitted that further progress in this area is probably going to be due to the investments of wealthy individuals (e.g., people like Steve Jobs who have illnesses) as well as outside of the United States. You're #1 America!

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