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Environment

Science, Global Warming, and Michigan

The IntersectionBy Chris MooneyJanuary 16, 2008 8:02 PM

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Well, so Romney won Michigan. Sigh. I was a McCainiac in 2000, and I was just starting to feel a little bit of the buzz again. But that's not what I wanted to say. What's fascinating about Michigan, to me, is that the particular nature of the race in this state led to a focus on climate and energy policy--subjects that, until now, have gone largely neglected by the mass media on the campaign trail. Indeed, even science came up some in relation to battle in Michigan between Romney and McCain. Hard to believe, I know, but it did. But in my latest DeSmogBlog item, I argue that we science and climate people should hardly feel content just because our subjects are finally getting prominently discussed. We need to keep pushing for a full fledged science debate--so that these topics come up in a concerted and deliberate way, not just incidentally because of the particular nature of a given state's economy (in this case, Michigan's reliance on the auto industry). Which, in turn, makes this yet another post about ScienceDebate2008--and thus, in turn, another post about "The Intersection" in its new form. See how everything fits together? If I were a Bokononist....

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