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Health

Strictly Death

Visual ScienceBy Rebecca HorneMarch 3, 2010 9:46 PM

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Wilson Hand Kidde, Pearly Man Skull, 2007 Images from Strictly Death: Selected Works from the Richard Harris Collection, on display in the Slought Foundation galleries in Philadelphia from January 23 through March 8, 2010. Strictly Death is an exhibition exploring the iconography of death across a range of artistic practices. It features contemporary artists including Jasper Johns, Robert Mapplethorpe, Kiki Smith, Irving Penn, Vik Muniz, Andres Serrano, and Sally Mann, alongside historical works by Durer, Rembrandt, and Goya. The exhibition includes artifacts including miniature bone carvings by Napoleonic prisoners, and baroque bronze skulls. All images Courtesy of Slought Foundation, the Richard Harris Collection and Balloon Contemporary

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Vik Muniz, Vanitas, Pictures of Soil, 1999This skull image is a drawing made with dirt, then photographed.

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This photograph shows the detailed records that the Nazis kept on every camp victim. Bad Arolsen, Germany.

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Richard Ehrlich- from Holocaust Archives Revealed, 2007-2008

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Katherine Du Tiel, Skull/Head (Inside/Outside), 1994 This image is made with an image of the inside of the body projected onto the outside of the body. Du Tiel writes “I am looking at scientific representation and how it is imposed upon the body. We demand some sense of order in the world. And we are always defeated.”

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Sally Mann, Body Farm #8, 2000 This image was taken at the University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Facility, using a 19th-century photographic process known as wet-collodion printing. This technique involves coating a glass plate with a mixture of gun cotton and ether, and bathing it in a silver solution. The plate is then inserted into an 8-by-l0-inch view camera, and the exposure made while the plate is still wet.

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