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Health

People with full bladders are better liars.

Seriously, Science?By Seriously ScienceSeptember 24, 2015 3:00 PM

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Everyone knows that when you really have to pee, it's hard to concentrate on anything else. Instead, all your self control is spent on not wetting your pants. Well, it turns out that focussing your self control on your bladder has an interesting side effect: it also makes you better able to lie. In this study, the researchers had subjects drink either small or large amounts of water, and then asked them to lie or tell the truth to an interviewer. At the same time, the researchers had other people watching to judge which subjects were better liars. They found that the people who had to pee "displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers." Something to remember the next time you play poker (just don't forget to wear your Depends!)The inhibitory spillover effect: Controlling the bladder makes better liars "The Inhibitory-Spillover-Effect (ISE) on a deception task was investigated. The ISE occurs when performance in one self-control task facilitates performance in another (simultaneously conducted) self-control task. Deceiving requires increased access to inhibitory control. We hypothesized that inducing liars to control urination urgency (physical inhibition) would facilitate control during deceptive interviews (cognitive inhibition). Participants drank small (low-control) or large (high-control) amounts of water. Next, they lied or told the truth to an interviewer. Third-party observers assessed the presence of behavioral cues and made true/lie judgments. In the high-control, but not the low-control condition, liars displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers. Accuracy detecting liars in the high-control condition was significantly impaired; observers revealed bias toward perceiving liars as truth-tellers. The ISE can operate in complex behaviors. Acts of deception can be facilitated by covert manipulations of self-control." Related content: Regardless of bladder size, all mammals pee for approximately 21 seconds (with video goodness).Creative thinkers are bigger liars.The poisonous pee byproducts lurking in swimming pools.

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