Register for an account

X

Enter your name and email address below.

Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Read our privacy policy.

X

Website access code

Enter your access code into the form field below.

If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Your website access code is located in the upper right corner of the Table of Contents page of your digital edition.

Health

Notes on Sewall Wright: Population Size

Gene ExpressionBy Razib KhanJune 6, 2008 10:39 PM

Newsletter

Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

Notes on Sewall Wright: Population Size:

Continuing my series of notes on the work of Sewall Wright, I come to the question of population size. This is important in Wright's formulation of population genetics and his evolutionary theory generally. One of the major differences between Wright and R. A. Fisher is that Fisher believed that, in general, evolutionary processes could be treated as if they took place in a very large random-mating population. He did not believe, contrary to some caricatures, that species were literally random-mating across their entire range (which is obviously false), but rather that there was usually enough migration between different parts of that range that for most purposes the departures from random mating did not matter. Wright, on the other hand, believed that in many cases local populations were sufficiently isolated from each other that they could be treated as populations evolving separately. This difference of views had a major impact on Wright's and Fisher's assessment of the relative importance of selection and genetic drift.

Related:Notes on Sewall Wright: the Measurement of Kinship, Notes on Sewall Wright: Path Analysis and On Reading Wright.

    2 Free Articles Left

    Want it all? Get unlimited access when you subscribe.

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In

    Want unlimited access?

    Subscribe today and save 70%

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In