Register for an account

X

Enter your name and email address below.

Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Read our privacy policy.

X

Website access code

Enter your access code into the form field below.

If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Your website access code is located in the upper right corner of the Table of Contents page of your digital edition.

Health

New virulent strain of flu found in healthy Korean pigs

Not Exactly Rocket ScienceBy Ed YongSeptember 12, 2012 6:00 PM

Newsletter

Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

Pigs.jpg

If flu viruses have favoured hook-up spots, then pig pens would be high on the list. Their airways contain molecules that both bird flu viruses and mammalian flu viruses can latch onto. This means that a wide range of flu strains can infect pigs, and if two viruses infect the same cell, they can shuffle their genes to create fresh combinations. This process is called reassortment. In 2009, it created a strain of flu that leapt from pigs to humans, triggering a global pandemic. If we needed proof that pigs are “mixing vessels” for new and dangerous viruses, the pandemic was it. Now, scientists have found a new strain of flu in Korean pigs that remphasises the threat. It’s an H1N2, subtly different to the H1N1 virus behind the recent pandemic. But it’s got all the makings of a serious problem. It can kill ferrets – the animal of choice for representing human flu infections. And it spreads through the air between them. I’ve written about this new strain for Nature News, so head over there for more details.Image by US Dept of Agriculture

3 Free Articles Left

Want it all? Get unlimited access when you subscribe.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Register or Log In

Want unlimited access?

Subscribe today and save 70%

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Register or Log In