The Sciences

NCBI ROFL: Rectal foreign bodies: eggplant edition.

DiscoblogBy ncbi roflMar 29, 2013 12:00 PM
eggplant

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ER doctors have to deal with some crazy stuff, perhaps the funniest of which involves people with various objects stuck up their butts. From salami and oven mitts to "plastic or glass bottles, cucumbers, carrots, wooden, or rubber objects...bulb, tube light, axe handle, broomstick, vibrators, dildos, a turkey buster[sic], utensils, [and] Christmas ornaments," the list is long and varied. However, we think "eggplant" ranks close to the top, if only for its sheer audacity. 

Management of rectal foreign bodies.

"Entrapped anorectal foreign bodies are being encountered more frequently in clinical practice. Although entrapped foreign bodies are most often related to sexual behavior, they can also result from ingestion or sexual assault.

METHODS:

Between 1999 and 2009, 15 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum were diagnosed and treated, at Izmir Training and Research Hospital, in Izmir. Information regarding the foreign body, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and outcomes were documented. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these unusual patients.

RESULTS:

All patients were males, and their mean age was 48 years (range, 33-68 years). The objects in the rectum of these 15 patients were an impulse body spray can (4 patients), a bottle (4 patients), a dildo (2 patient), an eggplant (1 patient), a brush (1 patient), a tea glass (1 patient), a ball point pen (1 patient) and a wishbone (1 patient, after oral ingestion). Twelve objects were removed transanally by anal dilatation under general anesthesia. Three patients required laparotomy. Routine rectosigmoidoscopic examination was performed after removal. One patient had perforation of the rectosigmoid and 4 had lacerations of the mucosa. None of the patients died.

CONCLUSIONS:

Foreign bodies in the rectum should be managed in a well-organized manner. The diagnosis is confirmed by plain abdominal radiographs and rectal examination. Manual extraction without anaesthesia is only possible for very low-lying objects. Patients with high- lying foreign bodies generally require general anaesthesia to achieve complete relaxation of the anal sphincters to facilitate extraction. Open surgery should be reserved only for patients with perforation, peritonitis, or impaction of the foreign body."

Photo: flickr/woodleywonderworks

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