The Sciences

NCBI ROFL: Why walking blindfolded in the Sahara desert might get you lost.

DiscoblogBy ncbi roflMar 28, 2012 11:00 PM

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Walking straight into circles. "Common belief has it that people who get lost in unfamiliar terrain often end up walking in circles. Although uncorroborated by empirical data, this belief has widely permeated popular culture. Here, we tested the ability of humans to walk on a straight course through unfamiliar terrain in two different environments: a large forest area and the Sahara desert. Walking trajectories of several hours were captured via global positioning system, showing that participants repeatedly walked in circles when they could not see the sun. Conversely, when the sun was visible, participants sometimes veered from a straight course but did not walk in circles. We tested various explanations for this walking behavior by assessing the ability of people to maintain a fixed course while blindfolded. Under these conditions, participants walked in often surprisingly small circles (diameter < 20 m), though rarely in a systematic direction. These results rule out a general explanation in terms of biomechanical asymmetries or other general biases [1-6]. Instead, they suggest that veering from a straight course is the result of accumulating noise in the sensorimotor system, which, without an external directional reference to recalibrate the subjective straight ahead, may cause people to walk in circles."

Photo: flickr/bachmont

Related content: Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: The road to baby torture is a slippery slope. Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Early to bed and early to rise: Does it matter? Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Chewing gum won’t help you walk, anyway. NCBI ROFL. Real articles. Funny subjects. Read our FAQ!

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