The Sciences

NCBI ROFL: Shopping cart etiquette triple feature.

DiscoblogBy ncbi roflNov 29, 2011 12:49 AM
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It's Trinkaus week on NCBI ROFL! All this week, we'll be featuring articles by John Trinkaus, whose work gives us "an informal look" at many aspects of everyday life. Enjoy!Clearing the supermarket shopping cart: an informal look. "An informal enquiry of the behavior of 500 supermarket shoppers clearing carts of litter prior to entering the store showed that 69% dumped the rubbish into another cart, 26% dropped it on the sidewalk, and 5% deposited it in a trash container."| | | |||||

Disposing of the empty shopping market cart--an informal look. "An informal enquiry suggested that only about one out of five shoppers, when finished using shopping carts, returned them to a designated depository."

Compliance with the item limit of the food supermarket express checkout lane: another look. "A total of 68 15-min. observations of customers' behavior at a food supermarket suggests that only about 7% of shoppers observe the item limit of the express lane. The averages tended to be about four pieces."

Photo: Flickr/Lisa Newton

Related content: Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Santa schmanta. Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Shocking study finds New Year’s resolutions work better than procrastination! Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Groundbreaking study proves it’s hard to see in the dark. WTF is NCBI ROFL? Read our FAQ!

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