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Technology

How San Francisco's Massive New Suspension Bridge Will Withstand Megaquakes

80beatsBy Veronique GreenwoodNovember 17, 2011 2:28 AM

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one_cable.jpg

One cable holds the bridge up.

San Francisco has its share of massive earthquakes, but the Bay Bridge, one of the city's main transit arteries, is not as quake-safe as you'd hope. That's why, alongside it, the state is building a massive new replacement structure---the largest self-supporting suspension bridge ever built. Jim Giles at New Scientist went to visit the bridge and provides a primer on its engineering:

In a regular suspension bridge, the cables that support the roadway are hung between two or more towers, like a hammock between trees, and anchored at each end by a connection to land. The new bridge is more like a sling. A single cable loops under the roadway, over the tower and beneath the roadway on the other side of the tower. The enormous forces placed on the cable by the road cancel out, leaving a structure that is balanced but not directly supported by a land anchor... As the [road] segment fell into place it revealed the full length of tower that stands behind it, an elegant structure made up of four concrete pillars. These drop into enormous steel foundations, parts of which were built in Texas and shipped to California via the Panama canal. The pillars are connected by "shear beams"---relatively weak steel components that are designed to break if the towers move. The two roadways, one each for east and westbound traffic, hang from the cables but are not attached directly to the tower. This arrangement means that the four pillars and two roadways will sway when a quake hits, but remain intact even through the strongest shaking that geologists expect the region to experience over the next 1500 years.

Read more at New Scientist

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Image courtesy of Bay Bridge Information Office.

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