Register for an account

X

Enter your name and email address below.

Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Read our privacy policy.

X

Website access code

Enter your access code into the form field below.

If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Your website access code is located in the upper right corner of the Table of Contents page of your digital edition.

Planet Earth

Yeti crab farms bacteria on its arms

Not Exactly Rocket ScienceBy Ed YongDecember 2, 2011 7:21 PM

Newsletter

Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

Yeti_crab.jpg

I've got a new piece in Nature about a newly discovered species of "yeti crab" that farms bacteria on its arms, then eats them. It lives in the deep ocean, near seeps that belch out methane. The bacteria living on its bristly arms (hence the name "yeti crab") feed off the seeping gases, and the crab encourage the bacteria to grow by rhythmically waving their arms. Go to Nature to read the full piece. Meanwhile, I loved this quote from lead author Andrew Thurber, which gets across how much there is left to discover about the oceans: “It was a big surprise. There’s a tonne of them, they’re not small, and they’re six hours off a major port in Costa Rica.” (Photos by Andrew Thurber) [embed width="610"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvDIMSXxpeE[/embed] [embed width="610"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLI3Ad-M3iM[/embed]

    2 Free Articles Left

    Want it all? Get unlimited access when you subscribe.

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In

    Want unlimited access?

    Subscribe today and save 70%

    Subscribe

    Already a subscriber? Register or Log In