Lifestyle

What Causes Vitamin D Deficiency

By Amber SmithApr 20, 2022 7:00 AM
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Are you feeling tired and run down? Do you have achy bones and muscles? You might be suffering from vitamin D deficiency. This is a condition that is becoming increasingly common, especially in colder climates where people don't get enough sunlight.

In this blog post, we will discuss the causes of vitamin D deficiency and what you can do to prevent it.

So, what is vitamin D deficiency?

Vitamin D deficiency is a condition where the body doesn't have enough vitamin D. This can lead to a number of health problems, including fatigue, weak bones, and muscle pain.

There are a number of factors that can contribute to vitamin D deficiency, including:

·        Not getting enough sunlight

·        Eating a diet that is low in vitamin D

·        Having dark skin

·        Being overweight or obese

·        Certain medical conditions, such as Crohn's disease or celiac disease

·        Taking certain medications, such as corticosteroids

If you think you might be deficient in vitamin D, it's important to see your doctor. They can order a blood test to check your levels and make sure you're getting enough.

What causes vitamin D deficiency?

There are a number of different causes of vitamin D deficiency. The most common cause is simply not getting enough sunlight. We get most of our vitamin D from exposure to the sun, so if you don't spend much time outside, you're at risk for deficiency.

Another common cause is eating a diet that is low in vitamin D. This is because vitamin D is found in fatty fish, eggs, and fortified foods like milk and cereal. If you don't eat enough of these foods, you may be at risk for deficiency.

Finally, certain medical conditions can also lead to vitamin D deficiency. Conditions like Crohn's disease or celiac disease can prevent the body from absorbing enough vitamin D. Additionally, taking certain medications, such as corticosteroids, can also lead to deficiency.

There are a number of different treatments for vitamin D deficiency, including supplements, diet changes, and exposure to sunlight. With treatment, most people are able to improve their vitamin D levels and reduce their risk of health problems.

Treat Vitamin D Deficiency with Elm & Rye Vitamin D3 Supplement

Image courtesy Elm & Rye

Elm & Rye has a vitamin D3 supplement that can be used to treat vitamin D deficiency.

Vitamin D is a vitamin that we obtain from food as well as one that our bodies produce. It's a fat-soluble vitamin believed to assist the body absorb and keep calcium and phosphorus, which are needed for bone growth and muscular development. Vitamin D has been linked in studies to help prevent cancer cell growth, treat infections, and reduce inflammation.

Vitamin D is only found in a few foods, although it may be added to many others. Despite the fact that it is difficult for many people to get enough of this vitamin through meals, supplements are the greatest and most straightforward method to acquire adequate amounts of this vitamin.

Vitamin D is important for calcium and phosphate intake regulation. Calcium is necessary for bone health. Phosphate is required for strong bones, teeth, muscles, nerves, and fundamental bodily processes.

Vitamin D is required for the proper functioning of your bones. If you don't have enough vitamin D, your body won't be able to get calcium from food, so it will steal it from your bones. This leads to a slew of problems, including brittle bones, fractures, and osteoporosis.

Vitamin D seems to assist in the growth of stronger muscles. Muscular strength has been shown to be linked to vitamin D levels. People with higher vitamin D levels had thinner frames and more muscle mass, as well as improved muscular function.

Not all supplements are created equal. Elm & Rye frequently have their supplements tested and reviewed by third-party laboratories. Then they make the findings available for public inspection for complete transparency.

How does a vitamin D3 supplement help with vitamin D deficiency?

A vitamin D supplement can help ensure that you're getting enough vitamin D. Vitamin D supplements are available in a variety of forms, including pills, capsules, and liquids.

If you're concerned about vitamin D deficiency, talk to your doctor. They can order a blood test to check your vitamin D levels and make recommendations for treatment.

Elm & Rye's Vitamin D supplement is made with pure ingredients and is third-party tested for quality. Their supplement can help you to get the right amount of vitamin D your body needs for optimal health.

What are the different forms of Vitamin D?

The two main forms of vitamin D are vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Vitamin D2 is found in some foods, such as mushrooms, and is also made by your body when your skin is exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) rays from the sun.

Vitamin D supplements are usually made from vitamin D-rich fish oils or lanolin (wool grease). Vitamin D is also added to some foods, such as milk, orange juice, and cereal.

Vitamin D deficiency can cause a number of health problems. If you think you may be deficient in vitamin D, talk to your doctor about getting a blood test to check your vitamin D levels. You may also need to take a supplement or get more sun exposure if you are deficient.

Which is better for vitamin D deficiency; vitamin D3 or vitamin D2?

Vitamin D3 and vitamin D2 are both types of vitamin D supplements. Both forms can be used to cure vitamin D insufficiency, although it appears that D3 is more effective than D2. Vitamin D2 is still given to folks with low levels of vitamin D since it is easier to give in higher dosages.

What are the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency?

Vitamin D deficiency can cause a number of different symptoms. The most common symptom is fatigue. This is because vitamin D helps the body to convert food into energy.

Other symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include:

·        Muscle weakness

·        Joint pain

·        Depression

·        Impaired wound healing

·        Bone loss

If you're experiencing any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor. They can order a blood test to check your vitamin D levels and make recommendations for treatment.

Vitamin D deficiency is a serious problem that can lead to a number of health problems. If you think you may be deficient in vitamin D, talk to your doctor. They can order a blood test and make recommendations for treatment.

What else can cause vitamin D deficiency?

In some cases, when children are lacking vitamin D it was typically caused by a disease called rickets. Rickets is a disease that softens bones in children and causes them to bow. This is because their bodies can't properly absorb calcium without vitamin D.

Today, rickets is rare in developed countries like the United States. This is because most milk and some cereals are fortified with vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency can also be caused by certain medical conditions, including:

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine. It's caused by a reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

People with celiac disease can't tolerate gluten, and when they eat it, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. This can interfere with the absorption of nutrients, including vitamin D.

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that can affect any part of the digestive tract. It's a chronic condition that can lead to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Like celiac disease, Crohn's disease can cause malabsorption of nutrients, including vitamin D.

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that affects the lungs and digestive system. It causes the body to produce mucus that's thick and sticky. This mucus can build up in the lungs and cause respiratory problems.

It can also block the pancreas, preventing it from producing enzymes that help the body to digest food. This can lead to malnutrition and vitamin D deficiency.

Liver Disease

Liver disease can cause vitamin D deficiency in a number of ways. The most common way is by interfering with the absorption of nutrients, including vitamin D. When the liver is damaged, it can't produce the enzymes needed to digest food properly. This can lead to malnutrition and vitamin D deficiency.

Another way that liver disease can cause vitamin D deficiency is by affecting the production of bile. Bile is a yellow-green fluid that helps the body to absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamin D.

Kidney Disease

Kidney disease can also cause vitamin D deficiency. The kidneys are responsible for filtering waste from the blood and converting vitamin D into its active form.

If the kidneys are damaged, they can't filter waste from the blood properly. This can lead to a build-up of toxins in the blood and vitamin D deficiency.

Skin Color

Believe it or not, skin color can play a factor in how little vitamin D you have in your system. Darker color skin has more melanin.

Melanin is a pigment that helps to protect the skin from the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. While this is a good thing, it also means that darker skin doesn't absorb as much UV radiation.

This means that people with dark skin don't produce as much vitamin D in their bodies when they're exposed to the sun.

Age

As we age, our bodies become less efficient at absorbing vitamin D from food and supplements. At the same time, our skin becomes thinner and less able to produce vitamin D in response to sunlight. This can lead to a gradual decline in vitamin D levels as we age.

Obesity

Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight.

People who are obese have more body fat, which can lead to a number of health problems, including vitamin D deficiency. This is because fat cells absorb and store vitamin D, making it unavailable for the rest of the body.

So, if you're obese, you're more likely to have low levels of vitamin D.

Treatment for Vitamin D Deficiency

If you're diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency, treatment will likely involve taking a supplement. Your doctor will probably recommend that you take a daily vitamin D supplement of 400-800 IU (international units).

You may also be advised to increase your intake of foods that are rich in vitamin D, such as:

·        Fortified milk

·        Fish

·        Eggs

·        Beef liver

·        Cheese

It's always best to discuss your options with a doctor. Your healthcare provider will know best whether or not your vitamin D levels are low. Sometimes the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency can mean other underlying conditions are going on.

As an example, if liver disease is causing low vitamin D levels, then a vitamin D supplement from Elm & Rye isn't going to treat the whole problem at hand. You'll want to know exactly what caused your vitamin D deficiency so that you can take a supplement knowing it is the best solution for your specific situation.

Other Health Risks Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency

In addition to causing Rickets and Osteomalacia, vitamin D deficiency has also been linked to a number of other health problems. These include:

Cancer

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of developing cancer. One study found that people who had low levels of vitamin D were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those who had higher levels.

Another study showed that women who had low levels of vitamin D were more likely to develop breast cancer than those who had higher levels.

More research is needed to confirm these findings, but it's possible that vitamin D may help to prevent cancer by:

·        Regulating cell growth

·        Reducing inflammation

·        Boosting the immune system

·        Diabetes

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to type II diabetes. One study found that people with type II diabetes were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D than those without diabetes.

Another study showed that people with type II diabetes who took a vitamin D supplement had better blood sugar control than those who didn't take a supplement.

Heart Disease

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to heart disease. One study found that people who had low levels of vitamin D were more likely to develop heart disease than those who had higher levels.

Another study showed that people with low levels of vitamin D were more likely to develop heart disease than those who had higher levels.

Depression

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to depression. One study found that people with depression were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D than those without depression.

Another study showed that people with depression who took a vitamin D supplement had better moods than those who didn't take a supplement.

It's not clear how vitamin D deficiency may cause or contribute to these health problems. More research is needed to understand the links between vitamin D and these conditions.

Autoimmune Diseases

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to a number of autoimmune diseases, including:

·        Type 1 diabetes

·        Rheumatoid arthritis

·        Lupus

·        Crohn's disease (see above)

·        Multiple sclerosis

It's not clear how vitamin D deficiency may cause or contribute to these diseases, but it's possible that vitamin D may help to prevent or treat these conditions by reducing inflammation and boosting your immune system.

Dementia

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to dementia. One study found that people with dementia were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D than those without dementia.

Another study showed that people with dementia who took a vitamin D supplement had better moods than those who didn't take a supplement.

Severe Asthma in Children

There is some evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to severe asthma in children. One study found that children with severe asthma were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D than those without asthma.

Another study showed that children with severe asthma who took a vitamin D supplement had better lung function than those who didn't take a supplement.

Will vitamin D deficiency make me sleepy?

There is no clear link between vitamin D deficiency and sleepiness. However, one study found that people with low levels of vitamin D were more likely to report fatigue than those who had higher levels. It's possible that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to fatigue, but more research is needed to confirm this link.

Can I take too much vitamin D?

Yes, it is possible to take too much vitamin D. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means it can build up in your body and cause toxicity if you take too much.

Symptoms of vitamin D toxicity include:

·        Nausea

·        Vomiting

·        Loss of appetite

·        Weight loss

·        Excessive thirst

·        Frequent urination

·        Kidney stones

If you take too much vitamin D, be sure to drink plenty of fluids and get some rest. You may also want to see your doctor to get your vitamin D levels checked.

Are older people at a higher risk for vitamin D deficiency?

Yes, older people are at a higher risk for vitamin D deficiency. This is because the skin becomes less efficient at producing vitamin D as we age. In addition, older people are more likely to be housebound or confined to nursing homes, which can further contribute to vitamin D deficiency.

Should I take other vitamins with vitamin D supplements?

Yes, you should take other vitamins with vitamin D supplements. This is because vitamin D can interact with other vitamins and minerals. For example, calcium absorption increases when taken with vitamin D.

Therefore, it's important to take a multivitamin that contains both vitamin D and calcium.

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means it can build up in your body and cause toxicity if you take too much. It's important to take a vitamin D supplement with a meal to help increase absorption. Taking other vitamins with vitamin D can also help increase absorption.

What does fat-soluble mean?

Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble vitamins. This means that they dissolve in fats and oils and can be stored in your body. Fat-soluble vitamins are not easily excreted from your body, so it's possible to build up toxic levels if you take too much.

It's important to take fat-soluble vitamins with a meal that contains fats or oils to help increase absorption. You should also be aware of the signs of vitamin toxicity and talk to your doctor if you think you are taking too much of a fat-soluble vitamin.

Final Thoughts on What Causes Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency is a serious problem that can have a big impact on your health. If you think you may be deficient in vitamin D, it's important to see a doctor. They can order a blood test to check your levels and recommend the best course of action. Don't suffer in silence, get checked out today!

Do you think you might have a vitamin D deficiency? Have you been feeling tired, weak, or depressed? If so, it's important to see a doctor. Vitamin D deficiency can have a big impact on your health and it's important to get treated as soon as possible. A simple blood test can check your vitamin D levels and your doctor will be able to recommend the best course of action. Don't wait, get checked out today!

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