Lifestyle

The Ultimate Pull Day Workout Backed By Science

By Amber SmithNov 16, 2022 3:00 PM
The Ultimate Pull Day Workout Backed By Science

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It's no secret that pull days are essential for a well-rounded fitness routine. But if you're looking to take your workout to the next level, science has got your back. In this article, we'll explore the ultimate pull day workout – one that's guaranteed to give you results. So what are you waiting for? Let's get to work.

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What is pull day?

A pull day is a workout that focuses on exercises that train the muscles in your back and shoulders. This type of workout is important because it helps to create a balanced physique. Without pull days, you may find yourself with imbalanced muscles – something that can lead to injury down the road.

The exercises that you do on a pull day should focus on the muscles in your back and shoulders. This includes exercises like lat pulldowns, rows, and shoulder presses. By targeting these muscles, you'll be able to create a well-rounded and balanced physique.

This type of workout is important because it helps to create a balanced physique. Without pull days, you may find yourself with imbalanced muscles – something that can lead to injury down the road.

What is the pull day target?

The pull day target is to hit the back and biceps hard, but you can also mix in some chest and triceps if you want. This workout hits all the major muscle groups in the upper body. Aim to do 3-5 sets of 6-12 reps for each exercise.

How is a pull day different than a push day?

A pull day is different than a push day in a few key ways. First, as we mentioned before, a pull day focuses on the muscles in your back and shoulders. A push day, on the other hand, focuses on the muscles in your chest and triceps.

Second, the exercises that you do on a pull day are typically compound exercises. This means that they involve more than one joint and multiple muscle groups. The exercises that you do on a push day, on the other hand, are typically isolation exercises. This means that they only involve one joint and one muscle group.

Compound exercises are important because they help to build functional strength. Isolation exercises, while they have their place, should not be the focus of your workout routine.

What are the benefits of pull days?

There are many benefits to incorporating pull days into your workout routine. First, they help to build strength in your back and shoulders. This can result in better posture and reduced risk of injury. Additionally, pull days can help to improve your overall appearance by creating a more balanced physique.

Second, pull days help to improve your grip strength. This is important because it can help you better perform everyday tasks, such as opening a jar or carrying groceries. Additionally, strong grip strength has been linked to improved overall health.

Third, pull days help to stimulate growth hormone release. Growth hormone is an important hormone that helps to build muscle, burn fat, and improve bone density. By stimulating growth hormone release, you can maximize the benefits of your workout and see better results.

Fourth, pull days help to improve cardiovascular health. This is because compound exercises like rows and lat pulldowns require more energy and oxygen to perform. As a result, your heart has to work harder to pump blood and oxygen to your muscles. This can help to improve your overall cardiovascular health.

Finally, pull days can help to improve your mental health. This is because exercise has been shown to release endorphins, which have mood-boosting effects. So if you're feeling down, a pull day workout may be just what you need to improve your mood.

As you can see, there are many benefits to incorporating pull days into your workout routine. If you're looking to improve your strength, appearance, and overall health, then pull days are a great option for you.

When it comes to working out, there is a lot of debate surrounding which days are best for certain types of workouts. For example, some people believe that it is better to do all of your cardio on one day, and all of your strength training on another. Others believe that you should mix things up and do a little bit of everything every day.

So, what does the science say?

Well, a recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that, when it comes to pull day workouts, doing a little bit of everything may be the best approach.

The study split participants into two groups. The first group performed a traditional pull day workout, which consisted of exercises like pull-ups, rows, and deadlifts. The second group performed a more well-rounded workout that also included some lower-body and core exercises.

After eight weeks, the results showed that the group who did the more well-rounded workout had significantly better results in terms of muscle strength and size, as well as fat loss.

So, if you want to get the most out of your pull day workout, don’t just focus on your back – make sure to include some lower-body and core exercises as well. This way, you’ll be backed by science!

Now that we've talked about what a pull day is and why it's important, let's take a look at the ultimate pull day workout. This workout is guaranteed to give you results, so long as you're willing to put in the work.

What are the best pull exercises?

There are many pull exercise options to include in your ultimate pull day workout backed by science. These are our tips to help you get the most out of your pull day workout:

Dumbbell Bent over Row

  1. Start by positioning yourself in a staggered stance with one foot in front of the other, and your knees slightly bent.

  2. Hold a dumbbell in your left hand and let it hang at arm's length next to your left thigh.

  3. Bend at your waist and lower your torso until it's nearly parallel to the floor. Keep your back flat, and don't let the weight pull you forward.

  4. Using your upper back muscles, pull the weight up to the side of your chest. Pause, and then slowly lower the weight back to the starting position.

  5. Complete all the reps on one side before switching to the other side.

Barbell Deadlift

  1. Start by standing with your feet hip-width apart, and your knees slightly bent.

  2. Bend at your hips and grab the bar with an overhand grip, your hands shoulder-width apart.

  3. Keeping your back flat, pull the bar up along your shins until it reaches thigh level.

  4. As you reach the top of the lift, squeeze your glutes and thrust your hips forward to complete the move.

  5. Reverse the motion to return to the starting position.

Pull Up

  1. Start by hanging from a bar with an overhand grip, your hands shoulder-width apart.

  2. Bend your legs at the knees and cross your ankles behind you.

  3. Pull yourself up until your chin clears the bar.

  4. Lower yourself back to the starting position.

  5. If you can't do a pull-up, try doing a negative (lowering yourself from the top position) or use an assisted pull-up machine.

Renegade Row

  1. Start in a push-up position with your feet together and your body in a straight line from head to heels.

  2. Grab a dumbbell in each hand and hold them at arm's length next to your chest.

  3. Keeping your core engaged, row one dumbbell up to the side of your chest while keeping your body in a straight line.

  4. Lower the dumbbell back to the starting position and repeat with the other side.

  5. Alternate sides until all the reps are completed.

Dumbbell Biceps Curl

  1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent.

  2. Let a dumbbell hang at arm's length next to each thigh, with your palms facing forward.

  3. Curl the weights up to the front of your shoulders, keeping your upper arms stationary.

  4. Pause, and then slowly lower the weights back to the starting position.

  5. Complete all the reps on one side before switching to the other side.

Upright Dumbbell Row

  1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent.

  2. Let a dumbbell hang at arm's length next to each thigh, with your palms facing your thighs.

  3. Bend at your hips and lower your torso until it's nearly parallel to the floor.

  4. Row the weights up to the sides of your chest, keeping your elbows close to your body.

  5. Pause, and then slowly lower the weights back to the starting position.

  6. Complete all the reps on one side before switching to the other side.

Zottman Curl

  1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent.

  2. Let a dumbbell hang at arm's length next to each thigh, with your palms facing forward.

  3. Curl the weights up to the front of your shoulders, keeping your upper arms stationary.

  4. At the top of the curl, rotate your palms so they face downward.

  5. Reverse the motion, rotating your palms back to the starting position at the bottom of the curl.

  6. Complete all the reps on one side before switching to the other side.

What's a good pull day and push day alternating schedule?

Combining leg and core workouts and alternating between three types of workouts is one approach to designing a push/pull training plan that works the whole body. So, for example, your weekly schedule may look like this:

  • Monday: Push day workout

  • Tuesday: Pull day workout

  • Wednesday: legs and core workout

  • Thursday: Push day workout

  • Friday: Pull day workout

  • Saturday: Legs and core workout

  • Sunday: Rest

If you would rather have a break in the week or do leg workouts with either your push or pull days, that is perfectly alright. Just make sure to not do push and pull workouts on the same day.

Should you deadlift on pull day?

The deadlift can be performed on either the pull or lower day, although it is most often done on the pull day since we will almost certainly be squatting on the lower day. It may be difficult to combine squats and deadlifts in one workout session, therefore they are often split into two days.

How can protein supplements help me on pull day?

Protein supplements can help you on pull day by providing your body with the nutrients it needs to repair and rebuild muscle tissue. Protein is essential for muscle growth and recovery, so getting enough of it through your diet or supplements is crucial for anyone who wants to gain muscle mass.

Why should I take pre workout on a pull day?

Pre workout supplements are designed to help you maximize your workout performance by providing you with energy, focus, and endurance. Taking pre workout on a pull day can help you lifts heavier weights and perform more reps, leading to better results.

No matter how you schedule your workouts, it is important to make sure both the push and pull muscles in your body are getting attention. This will help ensure that you are maximizing your muscle growth and overall strength. If you are feeling unsure about how to design a push/pull training plan, be sure to ask a personal trainer for help. They can create a program tailored specifically for you that will help you reach your fitness goals safely and effectively.

Whether you need an extra shove for your workouts or an easier way to recover, try Elm & Rye Protein and Elm & Rye Pre workout! Shop all premium supplements at Elm & Rye!

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