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Health

This Scientist Endures 15,000 Mosquito Bites a Year

DiscoblogBy Veronique GreenwoodApril 27, 2012 10:35 PM

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http://youtu.be/UaNj_Ex7fB0#t=59s The things we do for science. Researchers who study mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects sometimes use themselves as skeeter chow. In some cases, it's because certain species of mosquitoes seem to prefer human blood to animal blood. In others, though, it's a cheap, convenient alternative to keeping animals around for the insects to feed on or buying blood. And as it turns out, once you've been bitten a certain number of times you develop a tolerance to mosquito saliva. Entomologist Steve Schutz, seen above paging through a magazine while the bloodsuckers go to work on his arm, feeds his mosquito colony once a week. He has welts for about an hour, but after that the bites fade, occasionally leaving a few red spots. That's good, because at 300 bites a week, he averages about 15,000 a year. That's dedication.

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